Answer explanation - Academic Reading Passage Sample 3 - Zoo Conservation Programmes.

Go to the Reading Passage - Zoo Conservation Programmes.

Answer Explanation:

Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer in Reading Passage 3? In boxes 16-22 write:

Y   if the statement agrees with the writer
N   if the statement contradicts the writer
NG if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this

Note: Do not write 'Yes, No, Not Given' as answers to questions 16-22. The question-instruction clearly tells you to write 'Y, N, NG'. Similarly, do avoid writing 'Ture, False, Not Given' by all means. You should always follow the instruction.

Question 16:  London Zoo’s advertisements are dishonest.
Answer: Y.

Explanation: The very first line of the reading passage gives the answer to this question. However, many would read the part "One of London Zoo’s recent advertisements caused me some irritation..." and would assume that only one advertisement has distorted the reality and it is not justified to tell that London Zoo's advertisements are dishonest. One of our students has commented on this: 

"I think the first question: London Zoo’s advertisements are dishonest is a very broad statement. In this case, the author mentions of "one specific" advertisement from the zoo and it is incorrect to broadly classify all the advertisements from London Zoo as dishonest. I think the answer to that question should be 'NG'."

The real hint to the answer lies in the next few words of this very first line "so patently did it distort reality". Now read the whole sentence again -

One of London Zoo’s recent advertisements caused me some irritation, so patently did it distort reality.

Here the writer expresses his opinion that plenty of advertisements did distort reality. So the writer clearly states that plenty of London Zoo's advertisements did distort reality and are dishonest. Then he goes on to criticise a recent advertisement that caused her some irritation.

Question 17: Zoos made an insignificant contribution to conservation up until 30 years ago.
Answer: Y.

Explanation: The answer to this question could be found at the first line of the second paragraph where it states that "Zoos were originally created as places of entertainment, and their suggested involvement with conservation didn’t seriously arise until about 30 years ago, when the Zoological Society of London held the first formal international meeting on the subject."

Question 18: The WZCS document is not known in Eastern Europe.
Answer: NG.

Explanation: Let us examine what the writer tells us about the WZCS document and its exposure to the Eastern Europe.

At the end of the second paragraph: "This commitment has now been clearly defined in The World Zoo Conservation Strategy (WZCS, September 1993), which although an important and welcome document does seem to be based on an unrealistic optimism about the nature of the zoo industry."

At the beginning of the third paragraph: "The WZCS estimates that there are about 10,000 zoos in the world, of which around 1,000 represent a core of quality collections capable of participating in coordinated conservation programmes."

Now he tells that "...I have found that, in a year of working in Eastern Europe, I discover fresh zoos on almost a weekly basis." at the end of this paragraph. It is evident that the writer does not express anything whether the WZCS document was known to Eastern Europe or not. He keeps on mentioning about the WZCS document in the rest of the reading passage but nowhere does he mention Eastern Europe's knowledge or lack of knowledge of this document. 

So the answer is 'NG'.

Question 19: Zoos in the WZCS select list were carefully inspected.
Answer: N.

Explanation: Read carefully the second line of the 4th paragraph and answer the question 19. The writer includes that "One would assume that the calibre of these institutions would have been carefully examined, but it appears that the criterion for inclusion on this select list might merely be that the zoo is a member of a zoo federation or association."

Since being merely a member of a zoo federation or association is the criterion for inclusion in the WZCS list and the writer shows his concern on that, it is safe to say that the writer does not believe that Zoos in the WZCS select list were carefully inspected.

Question 20: No-one knew how the animals were being treated at Robin Hill Adventure Park.
Answer: Y.

Explanation: Look at the first few lines of the 5th paragraph. It includes "Occasionally had members that have been roundly censured in the national press. These include Robin Hill Adventure Park on the Isle of Wight...", which means Robin Hill Adventure Park's animal condition was not known to all.

Furthermore, it states that "This establishment (Robin Hill Adventure Park), which for years was protected by the Isle’s local council.... and it is evident that how they treated animals was not a public knowledge.

Finally, it says that "it was finally closed down following a damning report by a veterinary inspector appointed under the terms of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981". So without a doubt, this establishment did not maintain the standard and hence was forced to be closed down until a damning report by a veterinary inspector appointed under the terms of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981. If the concerning authority knew how this establishment treated animals, this could have been shut down even before 1981.

Question 21: Colin Tudge was dissatisfied with the treatment of animals at London Zoo.
Answer: NG.

Explanation: Colin Tudge was the author of Last Animals at the Zoo (Oxford University Press, 1992) and a former member of the council of London Zoo, according to the 6th paragraph of the reading passage. According to the author of this reading passage Colin Tudge argued that “if the world's zoos worked together in co-operative breeding programmes, then even without further expansion they could save around 2,000 species of endangered land vertebrates’.

Our writer further criticises Colin Tudge for his over optimistic hypothesis. Though the reading passage informs us that Colin Tudge was a former member of the council of London Zoo and the writer of Last Animals at the Zoo, it does not tell if he was satisfied or dissatisfied with the treatment of animals at London Zoo. This is why the answer is 'NG'.

Question 22: The number of successful zoo conservation programmes is unsatisfactory.
Answer: Y.

Explanation: The answer to this question is clearly stated in the last two paragraphs. No single line explicitly supports this statement, however, the whole context of the last two paragraphs reveals that successful zoo conversation programmes are indeed unsatisfactory. The supporting arguments from the writer are as follows:

"Even assuming that the WZCS’s 1,000 core zoos are all of a high standard complete with scientific staff and research facilities, trained and dedicated keepers, accommodation that permits normal or natural behaviour, and a policy of co-operating fully with one another what might be the potential for conservation?"

This seems an extremely optimistic proposition from a man... ... ... where are the facts to support such optimism?"

"Today approximately 16 species might be said to have been “saved” by captive breeding programmes, although a number of these can hardly be looked upon as resounding successes. Beyond that, about a further 20 species are being seriously considered for zoo conservation programmes. Given that the international conference at London Zoo was held 30 years ago, this is pretty slow progress, and a long way off Tudge’s target of 2,000."

 

Question 23: What were the objectives of the WZCS document?
Answer: B - to identify zoos suitable for conservation practice.

Explanation: The third paragraph first talks about the WZCS document and its purpose.The following line clearly states that its core purpose was to identifying zoos that are suitable for conservation practice.

"The WZCS estimates that there are about 10,000 zoos in the world, of which around 1,000 represent a core of quality collections capable of participating in coordinated conservation programmes."

Question 24: Why does the writer refer to Robin Hill Adventure Park?
Answer: C - to illustrate a weakness in the WZCS document.

Explanation: The first line of the 4th paragraph "The second flaw in the reasoning of the WZCS document is the naive faith it places in its 1,000 core zoos." clearly shows that the writer denounces the effectiveness of WZCS documents. On the very first paragraph, the writer points out that "Occasionally had members that have been roundly censured in the national press. These include Robin Hill Adventure Park on the Isle of Wight, which many considered the most notorious collection of animals in the country. This establishment, which for years was protected by the Isle’s local council (which viewed it as a tourist amenity), was finally closed down following a damning report by a veterinary inspector appointed under the terms of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981."

So it is evident that the writer mentions the Robin Hill Adventure Park to illustrate a weakness in the WZCS document.

Question 25: What word best describes the writer’s response to Colin Tudges’ prediction on captive breeding programmes?
Answer: A - disbelieving.

Explanation: It is quite clear that the writer did not believe Colin Tudge's argument that states “if the world”s zoos worked together in co-operative breeding programmes, then even without further expansion they could save around 2,000 species of endangered land vertebrates". Our writer calls his proposition extremely optimistic and challenges that no sufficient facts are there to support Tudge's theory. The writer also questions his proposition at the last line of the reading passage by saying that "Given that the international conference at London Zoo was held 30 years ago, this is pretty slow progress, and a long way off Tudge’s target of 2,000."

So 'disbelieving' is the word best describes the writer's response to Tudge's prediction on captive breading programmes.

Question 26-28: The writer mentions a number of factors which lead him to doubt the value of the WZCS document Which THREE of the following factors are mentioned? Write your answers (A-F) in boxes 26-28 on your answer sheet.
Answer: A, D, E.

Explanation: For questions 26 to 28, you have to identify three factors that made the writer doubtful about the value of the WZCS document. Six such factors are mentioned and you need to find the correct three options.

Let us examine all these three options:

Option A - the number of unregistered zoos in the world: The evidence for this factor to lead the writer to disbelieve WZCS document's effectiveness could be found at the beginning of the 6th paragraph.

"Even assuming that the WZCS’s 1,000 core zoos are all of a high standard complete with scientific staff and research facilities, trained and dedicated keepers, accommodation that permits normal or natural behaviour, and a policy of co-operating fully with one another what might be the potential for conservation?"

Option D -  the failure of the WZCS to examine the standards of the “core zoos”: The evidence for this option to be a reason for the writer to disbelieve WZCS document's value could be found at the beginning of the 4th paragraph which includes- 

"The second flaw in the reasoning of the WZCS document is the naive faith it places in its 1,000 core zoos. One would assume that the calibre of these institutions would have been carefully examined, but it appears that the criterion for inclusion on this select list might merely be that the zoo is a member of a zoo federation or association."

Option E -  the unrealistic aim of the WZCS in view of the number of species “saved” to date: The writer talks about this as a reason for this doubt on the values of the WZCS document in the last paragraph where he says -

"Today approximately 16 species might be said to have been “saved” by captive breeding programmes, although a number of these can hardly be looked upon as resounding successes. Beyond that, about a further 20 species are being seriously considered for zoo conservation programmes. Given that the international conference at London Zoo was held 30 years ago, this is pretty slow progress, and a long way off Tudge’s target of 2,000."

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0 # Sami 2017-10-31 04:38
Explanation to question 20 is wrong.
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